Types of Implementation Plans

A number of different factors will determine how MathScape is implemented in a district. Due to the fact that MathScape is composed of a series of distinct units, teachers can begin teaching the curriculum in their classrooms immediately or over a longer period of time.

To help new districts think about the best way to implement MathScape, three typical plans are outlined below. Some of the plans do not call for all of a course's units to be taught. Omission of a unit in any of these configurations is not intended to convey the message that somehow that unit is less important than the others are, but rather to acknowledge the reality that districts sometimes cannot teach all the units, for many good reasons.

None of the configurations presented here should be assumed to be the best or the only possible way to meet the needs described in the scenario. There are certainly many other possibilities that can work well. We are very interested in hearing your district's story, so that as time goes on, we can share examples on the web of what others have done and why.

Scenario 1

"We want to start a full implementation this fall. However, because it is our first year doing the curriculum, we do not expect to be able to complete the whole thing. What subset of units should we do?"

Possible Year 1 configuration:

Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8
What Does the Data Say? Buyer Beware Looking Behind the Numbers
From Wholes to Parts Chance Encounters Mathematics of Motion
Designing Spaces Making Mathematical Arguments Shapes and Space
Beside the Point Language of Algebra Exploring the Unknown
Patterns in Numbers and Shapes Getting in Shape Roads and Ramps

Completing five units in the first year is a very ambitious goal. Completion of four units is an excellent start. In this case, consider omitting one unit at each grade level depending on your state or local learning objectives.

Scenario 2

"We are implementing the curriculum over several years, and intend to do a few units the first year, then add the remaining units the next year. What units should we do each year?"

Possible Year 2 configuration:

Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8
Fall What Does the Data Say? Buyer Beware Looking Behind the Numbers
Winter Designing Spaces Chance Encounters Mathematics of Motion
Spring Patterns in Numbers and Shapes The Language of Algebra Roads and Ramps

Supplement from your previous text to meet the mathematical goals not covered in these units. Add remaining units in year two.

Scenario 3

"We want our students to get the equivalent of an Algebra I course by the end of 8th grade. What units should we do in grades 6, 7 and 8?"

Combining MathScape with a Standard Algebra I Text in Grade 8:

Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8
What Does the Data Say? Chance Encounters Looking Behind the Numbers
From Wholes to Parts Making Mathematical Arguments What Comes Next?
Designing Spaces From the Ground Up Exploring the Unknown
Beside the Point Language of Algebra Roads and Ramps
Getting in Shape Getting Down to Business Family Portraits
Patterns in Number and Shape Exploring the Unknown These units are interspersed with other topics from a standard Algebra 1 course.
Buyer Beware Mathematics of Motion