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Resource File: Early Childhood -- Literacy

Literacy Reading List


Adams, M. J. (1990). Beginning to read: Thinking and learning about print. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Bishop, K., Rankin, J., & Mirenda, P. (1994). Impact of graphic symbol use on reading acquisition. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 10, 113-125.

Blackstone, S. W. (1993, March). Augmentative Communication News, 6(1).

Burkhart, L. J. (1993). Total augmentative communication in the early childhood classroom. Eldersburg, MD: Linda J. Burkhart.

Butler, D. (1979). Cushla and her books. Boston: Horn Book.

Clay, M. M. (1979). The Early Detection of Reading Difficulties. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Clay, M. M. (1991). Becoming literate: The construction of inner control. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Coberly, L. M., McCormick, J., & Updike, K. (1984). Writers have no age: Creative writing with older adults. New York: Haworth.

Coleman, P. P. (1991). Literacy lost: A qualitative analysis of the early literacy experiences of preschool children with severe speech and physical impairments. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cunningham, P. M., & Allington, R. L. (1994). Classrooms that work: They all can read & write. Chicago: HarperCollins.

Cunningham, P. M. (1995). Phonics they use (2nd ed.). Chicago: HarperCollins.

Cunningham, P. M., Moore, S. A., Cunningham, J. W., & Moore, D. W. (1989). Reading in elementary classrooms: Strategies and observations (2nd ed.). New York: Longman.

Erickson, K. A. (1995). Literacy and inclusion for a student with severe speech and physical impairments. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Erickson, K. A., & Koppenhaver, D. A. (1995). Developing a literacy program for children with severe disabilities. Reading Teacher, 48, 676-684.

Erickson, K. A., Koppenhaver, D. A., & Yoder, D. E. (1994). Literacy and adults with developmental disabilities (Tech. Report TR94-15). Philadelphia, PA: National Center on Adult Literacy.

Frager, A. M. (Ed.). (1991). Teaching adult beginning readers. Syracuse, NY: Literacy Volunteers of America.

Gentry, J. R. (1987). SPEL...is a four-letter word. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Goossens', C., Crain, S. S., & Elder, P. S. (1992). Engineering the preschool environment for interactive, symbolic communication. Birmingham, AL: Southeast Augmentative Communication Conference Publications.

Harris, D. (1982). Communicative interaction processes involving nonvocal physically handicapped children. Topics in Language Disorders, 1, 21-37.

Katims, D. S. (1991). Emergent literacy in early childhood special education: Curriculum and instruction. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 11(1), 69-84.

King-DeBaun, P. Storytime just for fun. Park City, UT: Creative Communicating.

King-DeBaun, P. Storytime, Holiday Fun. Park City, UT: Creative Communicating.

King-DeBaun, P. Storytime. Park City, UT: Creative Communicating.

Kirsch, I. S., Jungeblut, A., Jenkins, L., & Kolstad, A. (1993). Adult literacy in America: A first look at the results of the national adult literacy survey. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Koch, K. (1970). Wishes, lies, and dreams: Teaching children to write poetry. New York: Perennial.

Koch, K. (1973). Rose, where did you get that read? Teaching great poetry to children. New York: Vintage.

Koch, K. (1977). I never told anybody: Teaching poetry writing in a nursing home. New York: Vintage.

Koppenhaver, D. A. (1992, March). Literacy issues related to AAC intervention. In Augmentative and alternative communication intervention consensus validation conference resource papers (pp. 29-41). Washington, DC: NIDRR.

Koppenhaver, D. A., & Yoder, D. E. (1992). Literacy issues in persons with severe speech and physical impairments. In R. Gaylord-Ross (Ed.). Issues and research in special education (vol. 2, pp. 156-201). New York: Columbia University, Teachers College Press.

Koppenhaver, D. A., & Yoder, D. E. (1993). Classroom literacy instruction for children with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI): What is and what might be. Topics in Language Disorders, 13(2), 1-15.

Koppenhaver, D. A., and Pierce, P. L. (1994, October). Written language research in AAC. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication Research Symposium, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Koppenhaver, D. A., Coleman, P. P., Kalman, S. L., & Yoder, D. E. (1991). The implications of emergent literacy research for children with developmental disabilities. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 1(1), 38-44.

Koppenhaver, D. A., Coleman, P. P., Steelman, J. D., & Yoder, D. E. (1992, August). The emergence of literacy research in AAC: Methodological issues and research priorities. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication Research Symposium, Philadelphia, PA.

Koppenhaver, D. A., Hedrick, W. B., Abraham, L. M., & Yoder, D. E. (1992, August). Social and academic organization of literacy lessons for AAC users. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Philadelphia, PA.

Koppenhaver, D. A., Pierce, P. L., and Yoder, D. E. (1995). AAC, FC, and the ABCs: Issues and relationships. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 4(4), 5-14.

Koppenhaver, D. A., Pierce, P. L., Steelman, J. D., and Yoder, D. E. (1994). Contexts of early literacy intervention for children with developmental disabilities. In M. E. Fey, J. Windsor, & S. F. Warren (Eds.), Language intervention volume 5: Preschool through the elementary years (pp. 241-274). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Light, J., & Kelford Smith, A. (1993). The home literacy experiences of preschoolers who use augmentative and alternative communication systems and of their nondisabled peers. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 9, 10-25.

Light, J., & McNaughton, D. (1993). Literacy and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC): The expectations and priorities of parents and teachers. Topics in Language Disorders, 13(2), 33-46.

Male, M. (1994). Technology for inclusion. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

McNaughton, D., & Tawney, J. (1993). Comparison of two spelling instruction techniques for adults who use augmentative and alternative communication. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 9, 72-82.

McNaughton, S. (1993). Graphic representational systems and literacy learning. Topics in Language Disorders, 13(2), 58-75.

Mirenda, P. (1993). AAC: Bonding the uncertain mosaic. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 9, 3-9.

National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. (1992, March). Augmentative and alternative communication intervention consensus validation conference resource papers. Washington, DC: NIDRR.

Norris, J., & Hoffman, P. (1993). Whole language intervention for school-age children. San Diego: Singular.

Pierce, P. L. (Ed.). (n.d.). Baby power: A guide for families for using assistive technology with their infants and toddlers. UNC-Chapel Hill: The Center for Literacy and Disability Studies and The Clinical Center for the Study of Development and Learning.

Pierce, P. L., & McWilliam, P. J. (1993). Emerging literacy and children with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI): Issues and possible intervention strategies. Topics in Language Disorders, 13(2), 47-57.

Pressley, M., Harris, K. R., & Guthrie, J. T. (1992). Promoting academic competence and literacy in school. San Diego: Academic Press.

Rhodes, L. K., & Dudley-Marling, C. (1988). Readers and writers with a differences: A holistic approach to teaching learning disabled and remedial students. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Ruddell, R. R., Ruddell, M. R., & Singer, H. (Eds.). (1994). Theoretical models and processes of reading (4th ed.). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Sawyer, W. E., & Sawyer, J. C. (1993). Integrated language arts for emerging literacy. Albany, NY: Delmar.

Shanahan, T. (Ed.). (1990). Reading and writing together: New perspectives for the classroom. Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon.

Smith, M. M. (1992). Reading abilities of nonspeaking students: Two case studies. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 8, 57-66.

Soifer, R., Irwin, M. E., Crumrine, B. M., Honzaki, E., Simmons, B. K., & Young, D. L. (1990). The complete theory-to-practice handbook of adult literacy: Curriculum design and teaching approaches. New York: Columbia University, Teachers College Press.

Stamatelos, T., & Mott, D. W. (1983). Writing as therapy: Motivational activities for the developmentally delayed. New York: Columbia University, Teachers College Press.

Stanovich, K. E. (1986). Matthew effects in reading: Some consequences of individual differences in the acquisition of literacy. Reading Research Quarterly, 21, 73-119.

Staples, A. H. (1995). Literacy assessment and instruction. In A. Neulicht, S. Primlani, & L. Chewning. COMPuter Utilization Training for Employment: A program guide. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Staples, A. H., Heying, K., & McClellan, J. (1995). Project Co:Writer: A study of the effects of word prediction on writing achievements with learning disabilities. Unpublished manuscript, The Center for Literacy and Disability Studies, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Steelman, J. D., Pierce, P. L., & Koppenhaver, D. A. (1993). The role of computers in promoting literacy in children with severe speech and physical impairments (SSPI). Topics in Language Disorders, 13(2), 76-88.

U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. (1993). Adult literacy and new technologies: Tools for a lifetime. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.


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This material was developed by the National Center to Improve Practice (NCIP)  in collaboration with the Center for Literacy and Disabilities (CLD)  at Duke University.   NCIP was funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs from October 1, 1992 - September 30, 1998, Grant #H180N20013.  Permission is granted to copy and disseminate this information.  If you do so, please cite NCIP.   Contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Education, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by CLD, NCIP, EDC, or the U.S. Government.  This site was last updated in September 1998. 

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