[EDEQUITY WEEA Project Dialogue]Will start training series

From: Ann Muno (annmuno@earthlink.net)
Date: Wed Feb 13 2002 - 17:05:05 EST

I would be happy to make them available. This year we are attempting to
offer our first-ever training series for Seattle-area folks who have
expressed an interest in doing all-girl programming.

As a result we are currently putting together a RAP manual and training
schedule. The manual offers much more depth than the modules sections
alone; however, the manual is mammoth and would be pretty expensive to
copy. It includes all of our evaluation materials as well, lesson plans
that go with the modules and a ton of other information.

Let me know what is relevant to you and I can try to figure out a materials

cost. Wish we lived closer so we could look it over together!

"Ann Muno"

-----Original Message-----
From: "Raquel Bauman"@phoenix.edc.org [SMTP:"Raquel
Subject:[EDEQUITY WEEA Project Dialogue]Can you share your modules..

RAP sounds very useful. I have an opportunity to meet with middle school
counselors several times each year and would like to share the contents of
your modules if possible. Let me know please whether you can make them
available and what steps must be taken.

Raquel Bauman

-----Original Message-----
From: Ann Muno [mailto:annmuno@earthlink.net]
Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2002 3:38 PM
Subject: [EDEQUITY WEEA Project Dialogue]Another project....

I work with an organization in Seattle called Powerful Voices (PV). We
offer a program called Girls RAP (Rights! Action! Power!) for students in
four public middle schools.

With great interest my staff and I huddled around the screen this morning
reading your comments. Seems many of us offering after school programs are

learning (or re-learning) that before we can help girls take leadership on
equity issues, they need to be able to create a common culture of respect
(or as I have interpreted Jill Denner's phrase "equity within gender" to
mean). Below I've copied a short article from our recent newsletter. The
article illustrates the ways we have struggled to create a common culture
of respect in our program. I'm excited to share thoughts on this topic and

look forward to comments.

Also, I want to comment on your second question about the need to "raise
awareness first before taking action". We have found that it's not a
linear process and each group of girls we work with is so different.
 Sometimes we do a little bit of awareness raising first, and then girls
are able to take action; other times girls' awareness is raised to the
point where they can hardly wait to do a project. (And we don't want to
stifle their great energy.) We work very hard to train instructors to read

the group and follow its lead. Our curriculum is made up of modules that
are theme-based ("What's It Like To Be A Girl Today", "What is Activism",
 "What Inspires Us To Action", etc.) and instructors can pick and choose as

they see fits the group.

Again, I'm thrilled we are able to share thoughts regarding after school
leadership programs. Isn't it great that our ranks are growing?

Ann Muno,
Program Director
Girls RAP (Rights! Action! Power!)

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