Re: [Fwd: Title IX Case]

Date: Tue Apr 11 2000 - 11:00:29 EDT

What I see here is not regarding number of girls versus number of boys
participating, but instead the issue of complaint appears to be unequal

Would it be acceptable in this case for the District to resolve the case by
not adding anything for the girls, still forcing them to play at the
elementary school, but by removing the boys' dugout, lights, bleachers,
etc.. (that they probably actually *worked* for, if that means anything we all remember Lazy and Lazier Daniels v. Merritt Island?)? If
they removed these things for the boys, and forced the boys to play at an
elementary school as well, would this be an acceptable solution under this
complaint? If so, the question which I have asked now a total of nineteen
times to the ladies and gentlemen of this group reoccurs; who wins?

While I understand Mr. Lawrence's desire to increase opportunities for his
girls and not to "take anything away from the boys," I would be willing to
place a wager here and now that this is exactly what will happen. That's
the same thing that Jessica "Nit" and Jennifer "Wit" Daniels said as they
watched the boys' things that the boys *worked* for (there's that concept
of *work* again) being hauled off.

In my estimation the boys would not win, nor would the girls. Things would
be just as bad for the girls as they are now, but it would be equally as
bad for the boys so things would be equal and Title IX would be satisfied.
If the boys don't win, and the girls don't win, then the only people who do
win are the retained attorneys and the bean counters and I, for one, don't
give a flying ahem.."dern" about them. I care about boys and girls, not
some wealthy attorney. (Sounds strange coming from someone who is going to
law school in a few years...LOL!!)

Amber V. DeWine


> School District Sued Over Title IX
> Reported by: Lynn Giroud
> Web produced by: Fred Slezak
> 3/24/00 5:01:33 PM
> It's a common site this time of year, girl's softball on a springtime
> afternoon. But, the Lady Rebels of Boone County High were battling more
> than their opponent. They were fighting what they said was inequity.
> A group of parents filed a federal lawsuit Friday alleging the Boone
> School District was violating Title IX by failing to provide equal
> opportunities for girls to participate in school-sponsored athletics.
> "It's not a situation where we want to take anything away from the boys,"
> said Edward Lawrence, father of one of the girls. "We're trying to make
> things equitable for the girls."
> The girls softball field is not at the high school, it's a few miles
> behind Collins Elementary.
> The boys' baseball field at the high school had dugouts, lights,
> and an electronic scoreboard. It's right next to a new football field
> a
> press box and new lights.
> The girls' field didn't even have access to a locker room or bathrooms.
> There was no girls' JV team, so these parents said, there's less
> opportunity
> for girls to make it onto the team.
> The boys get other perks, as well, like uniforms that are paid for and
> busses to ride to games. Parents have to drive the girls to practice and
> their games.
> School Superintendent Bryan Blavatt said the district has been fair to
> girls.
> "We've gone beyond what's required, taken an affirmative step to try and
> provide everything we can, not just because of Title IX, but because
> is a real concern of mine."
> Blavatt said the district has been working on finding an alternate site
> a new softball field. He said the lawsuit is without merit.
> The attorneys who filed the suit have dealt with these issues throughout
> the
> country, and of the 50 Title IX cases brought to court in the past eight
> years, the plaintiffs have won in every case.

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